IN&OUTTONIGHT 34 Friday, 13 November 2009 London Lite CLUB TALK By Scott Manson T HE best response to hard times is to hit the clubs. Look at the explosions in dance music in the late Eighties and Nineties. Both sprang from a recession and provided a new direction for electronic music. Creative types who found it hard to get a proper job would set up parties, or sit in the bedroom making music, fanning the flames for the next dance music evolution. The fact the scene is currently in rude health could be partly down to our chewy financial times; after all its cheaper to set yourself up as a solitary producer than it is to put together a four-piece band. The other, more telling reason, though, is the unstoppable rise of unoriginal guitar music. Dubbed landfill indie by Word magazine, and played by bands who looked like theyd been created by the marketing department at T4, this bland, crowd- pleasing sound turned indie music into mainstream pop. With their self-admiring WEEKEND FOR NOSTALGIC SNAPPERS Shake It: An Instant History Of The Polaroid DODOS, The End club, Wham!, London Lite... all great things eventually become extinct. The last batch of Polaroid film expired last month and to remember the medium, photographs by artists will be displayed alongside examples of its other uses. Until 13 December, Pumphouse Gallery, Battersea Park, SW11 (pumphousegallery.org. uk), Sat 11am-4pm, Sun 11am-5pm, free. Tube: Sloane Square FOR LITERARY LITTLE ONES David Walliams and Quentin Blake ROALD DAHLS best-loved illustrator has teamed up with Little Britain funnyman Walliams to collaborate on a second kids book, Mr Stink. They will be signing copies of their story tomorrow. Sat, Waterstones, 87-135 Brompton Road, SW1, 12.30pm, free. Tube: Knightsbridge FOR KOOKY CABARET The Lip Sinkers THE glam gang who peddle the ancient art of lip-synched pop hold two silly shindigs in Bethnal Green. Fri-Sat, Bistrotheque, 23-27 Wadeson Street, E2 (bistrotheque. com), 8.30pm, 12, 10 adv. Tube: Bethnal Green MARTHA DE LACEY LAIDBACKANDLOWKEY Sat, Waterstones, 87-135 Brompton Road, SW1, 12.30pm, free. Tube: Knightsbridge FOR KOOKY CABARET The Lip Sinkers THE ancient art of lip-synched pop hold two silly shindigs in Bethnal Green. Wadeson Street, E2 (bistrotheque. com), 8.30pm, 12, 10 adv. Tube: Bethnal Green Book signing: Mr Stink T HE Jazz Caf in Camden has hosted some of the best singers in the business during the past 20 years. From Georgie Fame to Gabrielle and Debbie Harry to Desree, many household names have performed at the iconic venue. And now... its your turn. Even if you cant sing for toffee and wouldnt even dare to have a go at karaoke, you can turn up and belt out your favourite tunes en masse at Hairbrush Heroes. Yes, Camden is a hub for the best current music and pulses with a vibrant musical undercurrent of the highest calibre every night of the week, but this wasnt going to deter promoters Mike Toller and Carl Hill from starting a new decidedly uncool singalong night at The Jazz Caf. Designed to encourage the tone deaf of London to congregate in the birthplace of live music and give them licence to sing along to the worlds finest rock and power balladry, Hairbrush Heroes promises a new voice to wannabe rock stars once confined to air-guitaring around the living room. A new direction for Camden perhaps, but you could expect no less from the creative minds who came up with regular club nights Club de Fromage and Feeling Gloomy. On the night in question my mates and I warm up our vocal cords over a few pints before making our way to The Jazz Caf. Clutching our pink flyers for the promise of free entry (usually 6/4 NUS) it doesnt take much time to get in and become accustomed to Debbie Harry belt- ing out Hanging On The Telephone through the sound system. The dance floor is already alive with enthusiasts feeding off DJ Carl Hill and we quickly join the masses prancing with enthusiasm to Footloose. We stop briefly to enjoy a miraculously cheap vodka lemonade (1.90) as DJ Carl announces a grand prize for the, ahem, best dancing. The few remaining wallflowers make their way forward on to the busy dance floor and we are hot on their heels. My friends and I take our work as shape makers very seriously, particularly Matt when he finds out the grand prize is an S-Club 7 Rachel Stevens doll. But there is stiff competition and as I look around the room I note a few important factors unit- ing the mixed bag of punters. First no one, from suits to spray-on jeans, has clearly ever been properly instructed in singing or dancing but, second, this is something to be proud of here. Third, and perhaps most important, BY CHARLOTTE MELVILLE HAVE THE TIME OF YOUR LIFE IN Brush upyour popstar skills! index.html2.html3.html4.html5.html6.html7.html8.html9.html10.html11.html12.html13.html14.html15.html16.html17.html18.html19.html20.html21.html22.html23.html24.html25.html26.html27.html28.html29.html30.html31.html32.html33.html34.html35.html36.html37.html38.html39.html40.html41.html42.html43.html44.html45.html46.html47.html48.html49.html50.html51.html52.html53.html54.html55.html56.html57.html58.html59.html60.html61.html62.html63.html