LITESPORT 42 Friday, 31 July 2009 London Lite ENGLANDvAUSTRALIA ASHES2009 THIRDTEST ONIONS PUTSGraham grabs three then Jimmy gets 4-11 as Australia collapse BY NEAL COLLINS Ricky runs into history but then gets out RICKY PONTING today became the highest run-scorer in Test match cricket for Australia after moving past Allan Borders mark at Edgbaston. Ponting started day two of the third Test against England needing eight runs to better Borders mark of 11,174 Test runs and achieved it with a clip through the leg side off Andrew Flintoff. Border, a former captain and national selector, praised Ponting as a worthy holder of the new Australian Test run-scoring record. Clearly, I am a great admirer, having been involved in Rickys selection in many great Australian sides, and having enjoyed watching him closely on more occasions than I can remember as a cricket media commentator as well, Border said. Pontings joy turned to anguish soon after when he became Graham Onions third victim of the day when he was caught behind. Ponting is now the third highest-run scorer in the history of Test match cricket behind Sachin Tendulkar and Brian Lara. Inbrief Another slow day for Tiger STEVE LOWERY took the opening-round lead at the Buick Open in Michigan as Tiger Woods made a slow start to follow that missed cut at the Open. Lowery posted a 63, eight ahead of world No1 Woods, whose scrappy one-under 71 featured three bogeys. Woods said: Just one of those days. Ive not only got to play well to make the cut, Ive got to play well to get myself back into contention too. Hall of fame for Northants SOUTH AFRICAN Andrew Hall starred with bat and ball as Northamptonshire booked a place at the Twenty20 Cup finals day at Edgbaston on 15 August with a 13- run victory over Hampshire. Hall top-scored with 39 to haul Northants to 134-6 before producing bowling figures of 3-25 as Hampshire collapsed to 121. Northants play Sussex in one semi while bowl-out victors Somerset will take on Kent. Dettori reaches his half-century FRANKIE DETTORI celebrated his 50th winner at Glorious Goodwood yesterday when he stormed to victory on Schiaparelli to claim the Coutts Goodwood Cup. He then went one better to claim a 51st win on Water Biscuit in the EBF New Ham Maiden Stakes. Dismissing all thoughts of retirement, Dettori, 39, said: It has taken me 19 years to reach 50 but it is a pretty big number. Live on Channel 4, 1.45pm Celtic contribute to Noble cause WIGAN coach Brian Noble has thanked Celtic Crusaders for giving his side the spur to launch their Super League season. The Warriors suffered a shock loss to the bottom side seven weeks ago but since they have won five on the trot. They play leaders St Helens tonight and Noble said: The Celtic game was a shock to the system. You need to slip on the mountain to realise you nearly fell off. Live on Sky Sports 2, 8pm Red Sox star is left red faced BOSTON Red Sox baseball star David Ortiz has admitted that he tested positive for the use of performance-enhancing substances in 2003, but insisted he knew nothing about it until yesterday and does not know what the substance was. At the time, baseballers were neither punished nor named and Ortiz said: Based on the way I have lived my life, I am surprised to learn I tested positive. TV AND RADIO Sky Sports 1 10am-7pm, highlights: 9pm and 1am. Channel 5 highlights: 7.15pm. BBC Radio 4 from 10.45am. Five Live Sports Extra 10.45am-6.30pm. WEATHER Tomorrow: Light rain expected for most of the day. BY JAMES GOLDMAN WORLDSTOP5 BATSMAN 1. S TENDULKAR (Ind) 1989-2009 12773 runs 2. B LARA (ICC/WI) 1990-2006 11953 3. R PONTING (Aus) 1995-2009 11188 4. A BORDER (Aus) 1978-1994 11174 5. S WAUGH (Aus) 1985-2004 10927 TOP5AUSSIE BATSMAN 1. R PONTING 1995-2009 11188 runs 2. A BORDER 1978-1994 11174 3. S WAUGH 1985-2004 10927 2. M HAYDEN 1994-2009 8635 5. M WAUGH 1991-2002 8029 LUNCHTIMESCOREBOARD AUSTRALIA, FIRST INNINGS (overnight 126-1) S Watson lbw Onions.....................................62 S Katich lbw b Swann.....................................46 R Ponting c Prior b Onions.............................38 M Hussey b Onions...........................................0 M Clarke lbw Anderson..................................29 M North c Prior b Anderson ...........................12 G Manou b Anderson .......................................8 M Johnson lbw Anderson................................0 N Hauritz not out ..............................................0 P Siddle not out.................................................0 Extras (1b, 5lb, 1w, 1nb).................................8 Total (8 wkts, 53.5 overs)..........................203 Fall: 1-85, 2-126, 3-126, 4-163, 5-193, 6-202, 7- 202, 8-203. To bat: B Hilfenhaus. Bowling: Anderson 17.5-5-56-4; Flintoff 13-2-55-0; Onions 12-2-46-3; Broad 9-2-36-0; Swann 2-0-4-1. GRAHAMONIONStooktwowicketsoff the first two balls of the second days play at Edgbastonthismorning--andfollowedthat with the vital wicket of Australia captain Ricky Ponting. Andasthetouristsreeledinshock,seamer JamesAndersonproducedawitheringfour- wicket spell before lunch to complete a col- lapse which saw SEVEN wickets fall for just 77 runs in the 23.5 overs bowled in this mornings session. DurhampacemanOnionsgotridof opener Shane Watson, lbw off the first ball for his overnight62,toroarsof approvalfromafull house of 18,000 at Edgbaston. And joy turned to ecstasy as experienced No4 Michael Hussey shouldered arms to his first ball and was clean bowled. If yesterday was a good day for ducks in soggy Birming- ham, today was the day for golden ducks as the tourists crashed to 126-3. Worse was to follow as key batsman Pon- ting, having passed the record for Aussie Test runs, was caught behind by Matt Prior off Onions for 38. For Onions, it was the ultimate reprieve. In the 30 overs allowed when the outfield had finally dried out yesterday, he bowled just three overs for 21 runs as the Aussies raced to 126-1 with Watson -- who had never batted above six in a Test -- rampant. This morning, with a bit of swing in the air, he bowled nine overs and took 3-25 as Australia were reduced to 163-4. And if Andrew Flintoff hadnt missed the simplest of slip catches off vice-captain MichaelClarke,Onionswouldhavehadfour and the Aussies would have been 180-5. Instead, that rare English error simply pavedthewayforJimmyAndersontoswing into action. Yesterday, on his 27th birthday, the Lanca- shire seamer bowled 10 overs, 0-45. After- wards,hetwitteredpitifully:Ivehadbetter birthdays! Will have to be better tomorrow. And he was. A lot better as he started a spell which, by lunch-time, read 7.5-5-11-4. Clarke, who had survived the Onions hat- trickball,aclearlbwshoutandthatFreddie blunder, finally used his pads one too many times and though it may have been going down leg, up went the finger. He was gone for 29 and Australia were 193-5. The usually reliable Marcus North, sug- gestedasapossibleopenerbyselectorMerv Hughes when the Aussies suprisingly droppedPhillipHughesyesterday,wasnext. Wicketkeeper Prior, so often derided for his glovemanship, leapt like the proverbial salmon to latch onto an edge off Anderson, and North had gone south for 12 with the score 202-6. Mitchell Johnson, so bad with the ball in this series, but surprisingly effective with the bat, attempted to halt the Anderson tide. It wasnt much of an lbw decision, but suf- fice to sayhefailed,andprovidedthesecond golden duck of the day. Yes, 202-7. Aussie keeper Graham Manou -- kindly allowed to play by that nice Andrew Strauss when Brad Haddin broke a finger during the warm-up yesterday -- arrived to chants of Who are yer? from the nearly-delirious Barmy Army. They might have asked Why are yer? as the South Australia skipper, needing to survive just a few minutes before lunch, wandered away on that busy path to the pavilion.Hescoredeightonhisdebutbefore Anderson scattered his furniture. Aussies went to lunch at 203-8 looking like they might, to borrow from Strauss, have lost their aura. A bit. index.html2.html3.html4.html5.html6.html7.html8.html9.html10.html11.html12.html13.html14.html15.html16.html17.html18.html19.html20.html21.html22.html23.html24.html25.html26.html27.html28.html29.html30.html31.html32.html33.html34.html35.html36.html37.html38.html39.html40.html41.html42.html43.html44.html45.html46.html47.html