LITESPORT 48 Friday, 26 June 2009 London Lite ANDYS NUMBERHowTeam Murrayare keeping our hero on his toes BY NEAL COLLINS Someone tell Elena its Wimbledon FORTNIGHT ANDY MURRAY is aiming to be the worlds number fun ranked player, judg- ing by his teams off-court antics at Wimbledon. The British No1 will play Viktor Troicki of Serbia in the third round tomorrow after demolishing Ernests Gulbis in straight sets yesterday in ruthless fashion. And while he could not be more seri- ous about his chances of making his- tory by becoming the first British mens champion since Fred Perry in 1936, he puts his relaxed mood and convincing form partly down to his zany training routine which yesterday saw one of his fitness trainers kissing his toes. It is all part of the bets and forfeits his team, led by coach Miles MacLagan and trainers Matty Little and Jez Green, play for on the practice court and which are designed to ease the tension. Murray explained: The thing thats important at these tournaments is to do what you do every other week of the year, not change things because its Wimbledon. You just try to act like you do every other week. We play football to warm up. We do the same thing here. We do forfeits and joke around and have fun like we always do. We do that when Im playing in Doha or whenever. My trainer was walking around with a cricket helmet on yesterday. If some- one asks what its for youre not allowed to tell that youve lost a bet. You just have to say you like it. We play for different stuff every week. The locker room attendant here has given us some cricket pads and cricket helmet, cricket bat, so its kind of Ashes-themed forfeits. When you start changing things you start to worry about everything thats going on around you. If you just act normal you deal with things better. Murray, who will go into the Troicki clash with confidence having beaten him in two previous matches, admits he tries harder to avoid the forfeits such as having to get lunch for everyone, while accepting extra push-ups or more bizarre ones such as kissing the other guys toes. All silly perhaps and certainly differ- ent from the Federer regime, but it obviously works for Murray, who revealed yesterday he had received a good luck message from the Queen. He also reiterated his dismay at being the only Briton left in the singles after Elena Baltacha slipped tamely to a sec- ond round defeat. Murray said: Its important everyone understands this is where were at. We cant go along accepting the results we have had. It needs people in charge to come out and say: This isnt acceptable. Its not good enough and this is what were trying to do to get better. Id rather there were more British players left in the tournament. Few Miles to go: Andy Murray with coach Miles MacLagan and trainers Matty Little and Jez Green -- doing toe-kissing push-ups -- and some of their other antics, inset To El and back: Baltacha on her way out of Wimbledon ELENA BALTACHA is determined to take the positives from what has been dubbed a disastrous Wimbledon, insisting there is a bright future for British tennis after all. For those who witnessed her complete capitulation at the hands of Kirsten Flipkens on paper an inferior player its hard to see where the light is coming from. A straight-sets defeat to the world No110 Belgian (far right) ended British interest in the womens singles and denied Baltacha the chance to join Anne Keothavong in the worlds top 100 shes currently 105. Baltacha faded badly after a promising start to go down 7-5 6-1 but afterwards spoke with more defiance than she had displayed on court. Whatever had happened this week, I know that I am going to progress and move forwards, she said. Its like two steps forward, one step back, but thats the way it is in tennis. It was a great opportunity for me. If you look at all the second-round draws, this was the best one. Its just a shame that I couldnt deliver. A lot of people get so obsessed with this one week of the year. They think that everything revolves around Wimbledon but it is just one week of the year for us. If nothing happens at Wimbledon, its not the end of the world. Her constant reference to week rather than fortnight spoke volumes, but Baltacha was clearly less worried than the fans watching thankfully not as many as there might have been as she was strangely exiled to the outback of Court 4. I beat someone. It was my best win. So, Im not worried, she said. Perhaps she should be. it is just one week of the happens at Wimbledon, its not the end of the world. Her constant reference to week rather than fortnight spoke volumes, but Baltacha was clearly less worried than the fans watching thankfully not as many as there my best win. So, Im not worried, she said. Perhaps she should be. BY GEOFF TEATHER index.html2.html3.html4.html5.html6.html7.html8.html9.html10.html11.html12.html13.html14.html15.html16.html17.html18.html19.html20.html21.html22.html23.html24.html25.html26.html27.html28.html29.html30.html31.html32.html33.html34.html35.html36.html37.html38.html39.html40.html41.html42.html43.html44.html45.html46.html47.html48.html49.html50.html51.html